Pathogenic Fungi and Fungal Diseases

Pathogenic fungi cause disease in humans and in other organisms, which is called as fungal pathogenesis. Fungal pathogens can be divided into two general classes’ primary pathogens and opportunistic pathogens. Currently, there has been a dramatic increase in fungal infections of this type, in particular candidiasis, cryptococcosis, aspergillosis, and zygomycosis. More recently described mycoses of this category include hyalohyphomycosis and phaeohyphomycosis.

The superficial mycoses -these are superficial cosmetic fungal infections of the skin or hair shaft.

Dermatophytosis - ringworm or tinea - ringworm of scalp, glabrous skin, and nails caused by a closely related group of fungi known as dermatophytes.

The subcutaneous mycoses - these are chronic, localized infections of the skin and subcutaneous tissue following the traumatic implantation of the aetiologic agent.

Infectious disease mycology - these are fungal infections of the body caused by dimorphic fungal pathogens.

 

Related Conference of Infectious Diseases